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The Use of Technology in the Admissions Process

The Use of Technology in the Admissions Process

Technology has drastically changed the way colleges and universities handle their admissions process. In today’s digital age, institutions are utilizing technology to make the process more efficient, convenient, and accessible for prospective students.

 

One of the most notable ways that technology has impacted admissions is through the use of virtual tours. With virtual tours, students can explore a campus from the comfort of their own home, without ever having to step foot on campus. These tours provide an immersive experience, allowing students to see the campus, residence halls, and classrooms, as well as hear from current students and faculty members. This is particularly helpful for students who are unable to visit a campus in person due to distance or financial constraints.

 

Online applications have also become increasingly popular, allowing students to apply to multiple institutions with just a few clicks. This process not only saves time, but also reduces paper waste, making it more environmentally friendly. Some institutions also have online portals where students can check the status of their application, submit additional materials, and receive updates on their admissions decision.

 

In addition to these changes, technology is also being used to improve the overall admissions process. For example, some institutions are using artificial intelligence to evaluate applications, helping to ensure that the process is fair and unbiased. Other institutions are using video interviews to get to know applicants better and to provide an additional way for applicants to showcase their qualifications.

 

Overall, technology has greatly impacted the way colleges and universities handle their admissions process. With virtual tours and online applications, the process is more efficient, convenient, and accessible for prospective students. As technology continues to advance, we can expect to see even more changes in the way institutions handle admissions in the future.



Other Resources:

https://mitadmissions.org/

 

https://www.nyit.edu/admissions

 

https://www.citytech.cuny.edu/admissions/

 

https://admission.gatech.edu/ 

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Educational Consultant

Early Action and Early Decision College Admissions: What You Need to Know for Fall 2023

Early Action and Early Decision College Admissions: What You Need to Know for Fall 2023

As the college application process for Fall 2023 begins, many students and their families are wondering about the differences between Early Action (EA) and Early Decision (ED) admissions. Both options allow students to apply and hear back from colleges earlier than regular decision applicants, but there are some important differences to consider before deciding which option is right for you.

Early Action (EA) is a non-binding option, which means that if you are admitted through EA, you are not obligated to attend that college. This allows you to apply to other colleges through regular decision and compare financial aid and scholarship offers before making a final decision. Many colleges, such as Harvard, Stanford, and the University of Michigan, offer EA. The application deadline for EA is usually in November.

 

Early Decision (ED), on the other hand, is a binding option, which means that if you are admitted through ED, you are obligated to attend that college. This option is usually only recommended for students who have a clear first-choice college and are willing to forgo the opportunity to compare financial aid and scholarship offers from other schools. Not all colleges offer ED, and the application deadline is usually in November.

 

It’s important to note that applying to a college through ED does not increase your chances of being admitted. In fact, some colleges have a higher acceptance rate for EA applicants than ED applicants. So, before deciding to apply ED, it’s important to research the college’s acceptance rate and policies carefully.

 

Another thing to consider is the financial aspect of ED, as you will have to commit to the college before knowing the financial aid package offered. You can compare financial aid packages by applying to multiple colleges through ED but, it’s not the same as EA.

 

To sum up, Early Action and Early Decision are two options that allow students to apply and hear back from colleges earlier than regular decision applicants. EA is a non-binding option and ED is a binding option. It’s important to research the college’s acceptance rate, policies, and financial aid packages before deciding which option is right for you.

 

If you are thinking about applying Early Decision or Early Action, it’s important to be aware of the application deadlines for each college you’re interested in. You can find more information about specific colleges’ EA and ED policies on their websites, or by visiting the Common Application website.

 

In conclusion, applying Early Action or Early Decision can be a great option for students who have a clear first-choice college and are ready to commit to attending that college. However, it’s important to research each college’s acceptance rate, policies, and financial aid packages before deciding which option is right for you.

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Educational Consultant

How You Can Qualify for a Full-Ride Scholarship to a University

How You Can Qualify for a Full-Ride Scholarship to a University

A full-ride scholarship is an amazing opportunity for students looking to attend university. Not only does it cover the cost of tuition, but it also provides other financial benefits like stipends for housing and books. So how can you qualify for a full-ride scholarship? Keep reading to find out.

 

Full-ride scholarships are typically reserved for students who demonstrate exceptional academic or athletic ability. For example, many full-ride scholarships are awarded to students who have been recruited to play for a college’s sports team. Other full-ride scholarships may be given to students who have demonstrated financial need or come from underrepresented groups. While full-ride scholarships are extremely competitive, they can provide students with the opportunity to attend college without incurring any debt.

Academic Scholarships

If you’re an outstanding student, you may be able to qualify for an academic scholarship that covers the cost of your tuition. Most academic scholarships also come with additional benefits like stipends for housing and books. You’ll need excellent grades and test scores to be eligible for an academic scholarship. It would help if you also considered participating in extracurricular activities like volunteer work or leadership roles in clubs and organizations.

 

Academic full-ride scholarships are merit-based scholarships that cover the cost of tuition, room and board, and other expenses for four years of undergraduate study. College scholarships are awarded based on academic merit, leadership, community service, or other criteria. According to weareteachers.com, students who receive merit-based scholarships have usually demonstrated outstanding academic achievement. Scholarships are a great way to finance your education, and many students rely on them to attend college. If you’re a high achieving student, it’s worth looking into scholarships that can help you pay for college. There are many different types of scholarships available, so there’s sure to be one that’s a good fit for you. Take the time to research your options and apply for the ones that you’re eligible for. It may take some effort, but it could be well worth it in the end.

Athletic Scholarships

If you’re an athlete, you may be able to qualify for an athletic scholarship. Athletic scholarships are typically awarded to students who excel in sports like football, basketball, or track and field. To qualify for an athletic scholarship, you’ll need to be recruited by a university’s athletic department. Once recruited, you’ll need to maintain good grades and stay eligible to compete in your sport. Most athletic scholarships also come with additional benefits like stipends for housing and books. 

NCAA Division 1 schools are the most competitive and well-known athletic programs in the country. In order to participate in NCAA Division 1 athletics, student-athletes must be full-time students and maintain a certain level of academic achievement. In addition, they must also meet NCAA eligibility requirements, which vary depending on the sport. For example, football and basketball players must complete 16 core course requirements, while baseball and soccer players only need to complete 14 core course requirements. As a result, NCAA Division 1 schools typically offer full-ride scholarships to the top 57% student-athletes in the country. These scholarships cover tuition, room and board, books, and other expenses related to attendance at the school. In return, student-athletes agree to compete for the school for at least one year. As noted by Bold, NCAA Division 1 scholarships are extremely competitive, and only a small percentage of student-athletes who apply will ultimately receive one. However, for those who do receive a scholarship, it can be a life-changing opportunity.

Need-Based Scholarships

In addition to academic and athletic scholarships, there are also need-based scholarships that can help cover the cost of university. Need-based scholarships are typically awarded to students from low-income families who demonstrate financial need. If you think you may qualify for a need-based scholarship, be sure to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. 

 

Scholarships are a vital way to make college more affordable, and need-based scholarships are an important part of that equation. Need-based scholarships are awarded on the basis of financial need, and they can help to cover the costs of tuition, books, and other expenses. Because need-based scholarships are not based on merit, they can be a great way to make college more accessible for students from all backgrounds. In addition, need-based scholarships often come with fewer strings attached than other types of aid, making them a more flexible option for students. For all these reasons, need-based scholarships are an important resource for making college more affordable.

Scholarships: taxable or nontaxable income?

Many students are surprised to learn that scholarship money is considered taxable income by the IRS. However, there are a few steps you can take to ensure that your scholarship money remains tax-free. The average college student leaves school with over $30,000 in debt, and scholarships are a great way to help minimize that number. But did you know that there are some restrictions on how you can use your scholarship money? If not used properly, your scholarship could be taxed by the IRS. Here are a few tips to help you keep your scholarship money tax-free:

 

  1. Use the money for qualified expenses: Tuition, fees, books, supplies, and equipment required for your courses are all qualified expenses. You can also use the money for room and board if you are attending school at least half-time.

 

  1. Do not use the money for personal expenses: This includes things like travel costs, entertainment, or clothing. Any money spent on these items is subject to taxation.

 

  1. Keep good records: Be sure to keep track of how you spend your scholarship money. This will make it easier to justify your expenses if you are ever audited by the IRS.

 

By following these simple tips, you can ensure that your scholarship money stays tax-free. And that means more money in your pocket to help pay for the cost of college.



Qualifying for a full-ride scholarship is a great way to reduce the cost of attending university. There are three main types of full-ride scholarships: academic, athletic, and need-based. You’ll need excellent grades and test scores to qualify for an academic scholarship. To qualify for an athletic scholarship, you’ll need to be recruited by a university’s athletic department. And finally, to qualify for a need-based scholarship, you’ll need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. For more information on how to qualify for a full-ride scholarship, be sure to speak with your guidance counselor or college admissions counselor.

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Educational Consultant

College Admissions: Test-Optional or Test Blind?

College Admissions: Test-Optional or Test Blind?

Applying to college can be an overwhelming experience, especially regarding standardized testing. Some colleges require students to submit their SAT or ACT scores as part of their applications, while others offer test scores optionally. In recent years, a small but growing number of colleges have adopted a “test-blind” admissions policy, meaning that they do not consider SAT or ACT scores at all when making admission decisions. So, which is best for you? Let’s take a closer look.

Advantages of Test-Optional Policies

While test-optional policies can level the playing field for some students, they can also create new barriers for others. For example, low-income students who cannot afford tutors or prep courses may still need help preparing for and taking the SAT or ACT. In addition, some critics argue that colleges are increasing socioeconomic inequality on campus by de-emphasizing standardized test scores. After all, wealthy students who can afford expensive tutors and private school degrees will still have an advantage over their less affluent peers. 

The Case for Test-Blind Policies

  • A small but growing number of colleges have adopted “test-blind” admissions policies in recent years. These colleges do not consider SAT or ACT scores when making admission decisions. These policies aim to create a more diverse and inclusive student body by removing barriers to access for low-income and first-generation college students. 


    Concluded that going test-blind helped increase both racial and economic diversity on campus. The study found that 19% of Black and Latino students were admitted to Pomona under its old policy; that number jumped to 35% under the new policy. In addition, 16% of admitted students came from families earning less than $40,000 per year; under the new policy, that number rose to 28%. 

    Going test-blind helped increase both racial and economic diversity on campus.” In other words: millionaires still have an unfair advantage over everyone else because they can buy their way into top schools by donating money or building state-of-the-art facilities.

There is no one-size-fits-all answer regarding standardized testing and college admissions. The best decision for you will depend on your circumstances and preferences. A traditional policy may be best for you if you’re a strong test taker with good grades. If you’re struggling with standardized tests or come from an underrepresented background, a test-optional or test-blind policy may give you a better chance of getting into your dream school. Whichever route you take, remember that a single test score does not determine your worth as a student and person. Good luck!

 

For any question contact 

Yeraz Benlian

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Educational Consultant

Which MBA Program is the Most Suitable for You and Your Career Goals

Which MBA Program is the Most Suitable for You and Your Career Goals

Have you always been interested in marketing and had the knack for coming up with new ideas constantly? Or be good at problem-solving and can work well under pressure? Well then, have you ever considered a career pursuing a master’s degree in business administration?Choosing the right MBA program is one of the most important decisions you will make in your career. There are many factors to consider, such as geographic location, business specializations, and cost. In this blog post, we will discuss the different types of MBA programs and help you determine which one is right for you. We will also provide tips on preparing for your MBA application. So, whether you are just starting in your career or looking to make a mid-career change, read on to learn more about the different types of MBA programs and find the one best suited for you! For instance, if you want to become a marketing manager for a technology company within the next five years, you must plan to pursue a Master’s in Business Administration (MBA) with a focus on marketing and management. Obtaining such skills and knowledge will allow you to be successful in the business world. Additionally, a degree like this will provide you with the opportunity to network with other professionals and make valuable connections. Thus, pursuing an MBA will help you achieve your career goals.

1. Which program is right for you?

If you’re interested in getting an MBA, you might wonder which type of program is right for you. There are several different types of MBA programs, each with advantages and disadvantages.

The most popular type of MBA program is the full-time program. These programs typically last two years at a traditional brick-and-mortar school. Full-time programs offer a more traditional educational experience and often provide more opportunities for networking and career advancement. However, they are also more expensive and time-consuming than other types of MBA programs.

Another type of MBA program is the part-time program. These programs allow students to complete their coursework while working full-time, typically over three to four years. Part-time programs are less expensive than full-time programs and can be a good option for those who want to continue working while earning their degree. However, they often require more self-discipline regarding work scheduling and everyday life juggling than full-time programs.

Executive MBA programs are designed for working professionals with significant experience in the business world. These programs typically last two years at a traditional brick-and-mortar school. Executive MBA programs offer a more traditional educational experience and often provide more opportunities for networking and career advancement. However, they are also more expensive and time-consuming than other types of MBA programs.

Online MBA programs allow students to complete coursework online, typically over two years. Online MBA programs are less expensive than traditional brick-and-mortar programs and can be a good option for those who want the flexibility to study on their schedule. However, they often require more self-motivation and discipline than traditional programs.

MBA programs come in all shapes and sizes, so research is important to find the one that’s right for you. Consider your career goals, your budget, your lifestyle, and your learning style when making your decision. With so many options available, there’s sure to be an MBA program that’s a perfect fit for you!

2. Factors to consider when deciding which school to attend

  • Location → When considering an MBA, one of the first things you’ll need to decide is where you want to study. The geographic location of your program can have a big impact on your experience. For example, if you want to work in tech, it makes sense to study in Silicon Valley. Or, if you’re looking for a fast-paced, cosmopolitan environment and are interested in finance, then a school in a large city like New York City is probably a good option. There are also plenty of programs located in smaller cities and towns, which can offer a more traditional college experience. Ultimately, the decision comes down to what’s most important to you and where you think you’ll thrive. So, when you’re looking at MBA programs, be sure to consider the location as well as the curriculum and job placement opportunities.
  • Financial Aid → Going back to school for an MBA can be a big financial commitment. Tuition for top MBA programs can easily top $100,000, and that’s not even considering the cost of living expenses. The cost of an MBA can vary widely depending on the school you choose to attend. For instance, at Harvard Business School, tuition for the 2020-2021 academic year was $73,440. Many schools offer scholarships and other financial aid opportunities to help offset the cost of tuition. For example, at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, nearly 60% of students receive financial aid. When considering the cost of an MBA program, it is important to research the various scholarship and available financial aid opportunities. 
  • Type of Education (Traditional vs. More Hands-on Approach) → MBA programs can vary widely in curriculum, faculty, and student body. For example, some schools may focus on providing broad-based business education, while others may allow students to specialize in a particular area such as finance or marketing. The faculty at different MBA programs can also differ substantially regarding their research interests and teaching experience. And finally, the student body in an MBA program can have a big impact on the overall culture of the school. Some programs may be more competitive and intense, while others may be more relaxed and collaborative. So when choosing an MBA program, it’s important to consider all of these factors to find the right fit for you.
  • Obtain Valid Feedback About the Programs and/or Schools → When it comes to choosing an MBA program, there are lots of factors to consider. But one of the best ways to get a feel for a school is to talk to current students and alumni. They can give you an inside look at what the program is like, from the quality of the teaching to the career opportunities available after graduation. So if you’re trying to decide between different MBA programs, reach out to current students and alumni for their insights. You may just find that they have the information you need to make the best decision for your future.

3. How to Best Prepare for Your MBA Application!

If you’re considering applying to business school, you’re probably wondering how to best prepare for your MBA application. Here are a few tips we have put together for you to get you started:

First, research the programs you’re interested in and make sure you understand the admissions requirements. Each school is different, so it’s important to know what they’re looking for in an applicant.

Second, start working on your application early. Don’t wait until the last minute to organize your essays and other materials. Give yourself plenty of time to write and revise your materials so they’re as strong as they can be.

Third, be prepared to take the GMAT. This is a standardized test that all business schools require applicants to take. Start studying early and give yourself enough time to take practice tests so that you can score well on the actual exam.

Fourth, get involved in extracurricular activities demonstrating your leadership potential and interest in the business. Volunteer for a nonprofit organization, join a professional organization or start your own business. These experiences will not only improve your application but also give you valuable skills and knowledge that you can use in your career.

Finally, remember that the admissions process is competitive. Don’t get discouraged if you don’t get into your first-choice school; there are many excellent programs. Just keep working hard and stay positive, and you’ll eventually find the right program for you.

So, you’ve read about the different things to consider when applying to MBA programs. Now it’s time for you to make a decision! Which factors are most important to you? What business specialization are you interested in? Do your research and find the best program for you. And don’t forget – once you’ve decided on a school, get started on your application! The sooner you start, the better. We hope this article has helped make your decision easier. If you need help with your MBA application process, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We are here to help! 

Good luck. 

  Yeraz Benlian

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Educational Consultant

Ready to Land a Summer Internship? Here are Six Tips to Ensure That you are Headed in the Right Direction!

Ready to Land a Summer Internship? Here are Six Tips to Ensure That you are Headed in the Right Direction!

As a Career Coach, I have met a lot of students who put off finding an internship until their senior year of college. Many students believe they are unqualified to apply for jobs like this since they lack experience.

During the summer between their freshman and sophomore years of college, students should begin developing their professional networks and applying for internships. This is an excellent opportunity for students to broaden their connections and gain hands-on experience in their chosen field while also earning a bachelor’s degree. Here are some pointers on how to apply for summer internships:

1. Start the Search Process Early

Internships are a great way to learn about a variety of different career paths! They are a great way for people to discover if they made the wrong career choice. It allows you to make a more informed decision about what you want to do after graduation if you gain practical hands-on experience. The sooner you realize this, the less time and money you would waste switching majors within the first two years of college.

2. Write & Polish Your Resume & Cover Letter

This is the most critical part of the internship application process. One of the many benefits of internships is that they will help you develop more skills and enhance your resume. It is critical to showcase that you have the relevant work experience or skills when applying for a position. Make sure to use chronological formatting and that there are no grammatical errors. Have someone proofread your resume before submitting it.

Although some companies don’t require a cover letter, it is always good to include one. When writing cover letters, I advise students to write their first draft with as much passion as possible. This is an opportunity to emphasize your accomplishments, your ability to express yourself properly, and how your abilities will aid you in your new position. Thus, making a strong case for why you’re the best candidate for the job. Then, edit and polish it to make it sound professional.

3. Network, Network, Network!

An internship is a great way to meet new people and build a network that will help you in the future. Many of the people I know who have landed full-time jobs after graduation have done so through connections they made through their internships or summer jobs. Look no further if you’re unsure of how to proceed. Start by becoming a member of a club on campus that relates to your career goals. Then, reach out to people on LinkedIn or by email if they work for a company or in a profession that interests you.

Another great networking strategy is to ask LinkedIn contacts for an informal phone call to learn more about them, their employment journey, or their organization. In the event that an internship position becomes available or is created at their company in the future, they are likely to reach out to you as a potential candidate. As an incentive, your network can serve as excellent references who can vouch for your work ethic and abilities.

4. Apply To Many Internships

When applying to summer internships it is important to remember to keep an open mind and apply to as many different types of internships. First, start by making a list of companies you would like to work for. Then, visit their websites to learn more about them. Internships and full-time employment opportunities are readily available on the websites of most businesses, particularly for large companies. You may also want to check out sites like University’s Career Center, Handshake, Linkedin, and Indeed.

 

5. Prep For The Interviews

It is important to go beyond just preparing for the questions you might be asked during the interview. Make sure you do your homework! You should research and be well-informed and knowledgeable about the company. Employers like this because it demonstrates that you have a genuine interest in the company and the ability to prepare thoroughly. Finally, remember to include some examples from your own life. If you lack relevant work experience, don’t be afraid to seize any opportunity to acquire it.

6. Post-interview Etiquette

After the interview, many people fail to express their gratitude and enthusiasm. Because of this, it is imperative that you write a thank you letter or email to each person who interviewed you following the interview. This will help you stand out from the crowd when applying for jobs.

 

In conclusion, whether you’re a current college student, a recent college graduate, or in the midst of a career change, making a list of industries that best suit your knowledge, talents, and interests may be a good place to start. Having completed multiple internships prior to graduation will make the job search process more seamless. You should now have a better understanding of what employers are looking for in a candidate and will feel more at ease during the interview process.

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Educational Consultant

5 Financial Aid Mistakes Newly Accepted College Students Make

5 Financial Aid Mistakes Newly Accepted College Students Make

Have you made your final college decision yet? Well, there are several things to take into consideration after informing the college/university of your decision. One of the most significant challenges incoming freshman and transfer students make is not figuring out the cost of attendance and affordability before applying to a particular college/university.
Determining how you or your parents will pay for college can be a bit of a headache. Many high school seniors and community college students do not realize how tedious and time-consuming applying for financial aid resources can be. Being newly admitted to a college/university, you and your parents must take the time to thoroughly go over the financial aid package awarded to you by the institution. Here are some points to consider when evaluating your financial assistance award not to make any unwise decisions.

Mistake #1: Ignoring all college student scholarships

You may believe that just filling out and submitting the FAFSA or CSS Profile forms each year is the only sensible way to obtain financial aid. However, many students do not know that they miss out on other financial resources that they may be eligible to receive. These resources include scholarships that are available through your college/university or other outside organizations. Scholarships can be very appealing to many college students. Most scholarships are known for being based on academic excellence, but scholarships are also scholarships based on race, disability, athletics, interests, hobbies, community, research, and religion.

Mistake #2: Accepting all your financial aid award

Do not assume that you need to accept everything listed in your financial aid award because that may leave you with more debt after graduation. It is essential to understand that federal grants and scholarships are affordable, and you should accept those. On the other hand, student loans need to be paid back; if you need to take out student loans, you choose the one with the lowest interest rate possible. If you are still unclear about your financial aid award, please ask your college/university’s financial assistance office to guide you through the process.

Mistake #3: Not Registering for Courses on Time

If you plan to accept private and other federal student loans, you must educate yourself about the differences between each type of loan. Student loans come in various forms: subsidized, unsubsidized, parent plus loans, grad plus loans, and private loans. We suggest that parents also take the time to obtain information and inform themselves about the interest rates and repayment options for each loan type.

Once you have a brief understanding of what each one entails, weigh out your options and narrow them down to one-to-two types of loans. Students should consider that borrowing federal student loans is the right choice because they are cheaper, more accessible, and have great repayment plans.

Mistake #4: Not Attending Orientation

Many college students believe that it is unnecessary to attend their new school orientation because they are already familiar with college life. Students should be encouraged to participate in an orientation program at their new college or university. It is an excellent opportunity to get acquainted with your new classmates, professors, staff, and campus. Although orientation programs provide an overload of information to incoming students, we encourage you to be proactive by taking notes and asking questions.

Mistake #5: Don’t get ahead of yourself!

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Lastly, college students think that they have all the answers, which is a false presumption. Transfer students believe that by attending community college for two years, they already know everything. College students need to learn that there is always room for improvement, whether improving their time management skills or studying for a class. Alternatively, study habits will change once a student transfers to a 4-year college/university. For instance, a biology student would probably spend about five-to-six hours studying for a course and its lab. Still, once they transfer to the university of their choice, they may be spending over ten hours a week for an advanced biology class. We work with our students to determine what study habits, skills, and extracurricular activities they need to reassess once they transfer to a 4-year institution.
At Pathway2Career Consulting, we acknowledge that college students need personalized guidance and a strategic plan for transferring. Our goal is to help you be successful right from the start to the end of your transfer process. The transfer process requires a lot of focus and effort on behalf of the student. Therefore, it is crucial to work closely with our consultants to ensure that you meet with the correct departments, submit the proper documents on time, and have a clear plan for a seamless transition.
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Educational Consultant

5 Entry Level Jobs for Architecture Majors

5 Entry Level Jobs for Architecture Majors

Are you currently pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Architecture and planning on graduating this year? If yes, then we have some insights to help you navigate the start of your career and succeed in the field of architecture.

What are my options as an entry-level architect?

Entry-level architects’ duties vary from preparing drawings, blueprints, 3D models using digital software, making schematic drawings of buildings, and getting approvals from architects or engineers for the models. As an entry-level architect, you need to assist your firm’s supervisor with each assigned project. In addition to helping the head architect or engineer with a specific task, entry-level architects are responsible for ensuring that all projects adhere to practice standards and meet their client’s needs. Entry-level architects should implement an effective communication system with clients to avoid misunderstandings or issues during a project, whether determining their exact requirements, developing a construction plan, or adhering to building codes and regulations. Becoming an entry-level architect position is an excellent opportunity to learn and develop your skills. Once you have gained enough experience, you may be assigned to more complex projects or even manage them.

Does my degree make me qualified for an entry-level position?

Does my degree make me qualified for an entry-level position? Entry-level architecture positions require a bachelor’s degree in architecture, which takes up to 5-years to complete. The degree program you graduate from is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). During your undergraduate years, you should try to gain hands-on experience through internships. Merging your education with a professional background has provided you with the desirable skills to excel as an architect.
By obtaining a Bachelor’s degree in Architecture, many students develop a range of desirable creative, visual, practical, and design-based skills applicable to numerous career areas in creative industries. Here are five of the most common entry-level career paths that architecture students pursue.

1. Landscape Designer

Do you have an appreciation for nature, a creative flair, and a passion for working with your hands? Who knew that landscape architects do just that. A landscape architect draws the conceptual plans and coordinates the landscaping projects. Landscape Architects plan and design land projects, but they must consider the cost and their clients’ needs and requirements. They also collaborate with engineers and construction managers to complete tasks. While working on projects, landscape architects have to consider different environmental factors and wildlife when building structures surrounding their habitat. Most landscape architects are self-employed or work for state and federal governments.

Alternative Careers: Urban Planner, City Planner, Residential Architect, Product Designer, and Tourism Planner

Degree Level: Bachelor’s degree

Skills: Verbal Communication, Active Listening, Creativity, Critical Thinking, Reading Comprehension, and Computer Skills [CADD for model preparation and Geographic Information Systems (GIS)]

Average Annual Salary: $73,160

2. Construction Project Manager

Have you always been crafty with your hands, or as a kid, did you always play with Legos? Becoming a construction project manager would be the ideal job for you! Construction Project Managers are unusually overseeing a site construction and are responsible for managing the time, cost, and quality of construction projects. Sometimes they may be asked to work on other projects such as residential buildings, commercial buildings, industrial buildings, roads, bridges, and schools. Being a construction project manager gives you flexibility, such as being self-employed or working for construction management companies, developers, or property owners.

Alternative Careers: Facilities Manager, Site Engineer, Building Safety Inspector, Business Analyst, and Sustainability Consultant

Degree Level: Bachelor’s degree

Skills: Communication, Risk Management, Technology, Negotiation, and Team Management

Average Annual Salary: $103,110

3. Lighting Designer

Do you love attending concerts, shows, and theatres? Have you ever wondered why you had such an incredible experience? This job might be the perfect match for you. Lighting Designers are behind the scene people who bring life into the productions on stage. You need to be actively involved throughout the design process, typically helping with research, attending rehearsals and design meetings, and sharing their inputs on lighting ideas with other production team members. The lighting designer is responsible for color, special effects, safety, fog, floor surfaces, and hanging lighting designs. Lighting designers are also involved in creating lighting charts using computer software to produce a cue sheet for the electrician and a focus chart for each lighting fixture.

Alternative Careers: Set Designer, Stage Designer, Exhibition Designer, Fashion Designer, Interior & Spatial Designer

Degree Level: Bachelor’s degree

Skills: Technical skills, Ability to work under pressure to tight deadlines, Good communicator, Excellent color vision, Lighting, and Computer software

Average Annual Salary: $61,020

4. IT Architect

Are you intrigued by computer programming and technical communications? Why not become an IT architect? It might be the perfect career path for you. IT architects work at different companies and organizations to ensure that their computer networks are protected and maintained correctly. IT architects are responsible for analyzing and implementing risk management techniques, system design assumptions, and other information system issues. They use computer design software to model and test network plans before finalizing and implementing them. Such computer software allows IT architects to resolve technical problems, change routers or focus on advancing existing computer networks. The IT architect must also work with the project management team to make decisions promptly and keep each project on track.

Alternative Careers: PR & Communications Specialist, Tech Founder, Architectural Photographer, Teacher,

Degree Level: Bachelor’s degree

Skills: Strong communications skills, Problem-solving skills, Relationship skills, Negotiation, and Communicate complex technical information to all stakeholders of a project

Average Annual Salary: $109,020

5. Game Designer

Have you always been fascinated by video games? Do you want to turn your dreams of playing video games such as Call of Duty, Rocket League, NBA 2K20, Grand Theft Auto, and Halo into a potential career? Then, consider merging your interests into a career that fulfills your interests! A game designer works with other team members to develop and design video games. They play an integral role in creating and designing characters, levels, animations, and more. To become a game designer, you need to be highly skilled with various computer programming languages and software.

Alternative Careers: 3D Visualization Artist (modeling & rendering), User Experience (UX) Design, Graphic Designer, and Web Designer

Degree Level: Bachelor’s degree

Skills: Creativity, Computer software and systems, Communication, Collaboration, and Project management skills

Average Annual Salary: $105,950

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Educational Consultant

5 Mistakes Students Make During Their Transfer Process

5 Mistakes Students Make During Their Transfer Process

Transferring from a community college to a 4-year college/university is a big stepping stone. College students don’t realize the complexities that come with the transition process. From fulfilling requirements to a wave of emotions, college students feel overwhelmed when navigating the transfer process. We at Pathway2Career Consulting are here to help you avoid these five mistakes throughout your transfer process.

Mistake #1: Not Having Transfer Courses Evaluated

One of the most common mistakes transfer students makes is forgetting to get their transfer courses evaluated. Transfer course evaluation is a crucial final step to take before transferring and sending a final copy of your transcript to your chosen institution. If you’re planning on transferring to a CSU, then your college needs to provide you with the CSU Breadth certification on your official transcript. On the other hand, if you’re transferring to a UC, your transcript needs to be IGETC verified. Depending on where you are transferring, your new institution follows different levels and types of course equivalencies. We work with each student individually to determine the requirements they need to fulfill during their transfer process from community college to a 4-year college/university.

Mistake #2: Not Submitted FAFSA & CSS Profile Forms on Time

The second mistake most college students make is not completing the FAFSA or CSS Profile forms completely and on time. These financial aid applications can seem tedious and time-consuming. However, many college students think they qualify for them without understanding how to fill and complete the forms correctly. In some cases, students forget to submit either one of the applications on time and suffer the consequences of late submission. Due to situations like the one previously stated, obtaining financial aid will become difficult during your first semester or quarter at your school. That is why we at Pathway2Career Consulting will work closely with you and your family to ensure that you have completed every section of both financial aid applications and submitted it correctly and with ease.

Mistake #3: Not Registering for Courses on Time

Once a college student has been accepted to a 4-year college/university and has decided to attend that institution, they have to create a login and complete their onboarding checklist before orientation. However, many students forget to complete their intake and onboarding process for admissions at their new institution. Students fail to attend transfer advising during orientation and fail to register on time for their upcoming semester or quarter by not completing the enrollment steps. We will work with each student to ensure that all stages of registration are complete.

Mistake #4: Not Attending Orientation

Many college students believe that it is unnecessary to attend their new school orientation because they are already familiar with college life. Students should be encouraged to participate in an orientation program at their new college or university. It is an excellent opportunity to get acquainted with your new classmates, professors, staff, and campus. Although orientation programs provide an overload of information to incoming students, we encourage you to be proactive by taking notes and asking questions.

Mistake #5: Don’t get ahead of yourself!

Lastly, college students think that they have all the answers, which is a false presumption. Transfer students believe that by attending community college for two years, they already know everything. College students need to learn that there is always room for improvement, whether improving their time management skills or studying for a class. Alternatively, study habits will change once a student transfers to a 4-year college/university. For instance, a biology student would probably spend about five-to-six hours studying for a course and its lab. Still, once they transfer to the university of their choice, they may be spending over ten hours a week for an advanced biology class. We work with our students to determine what study habits, skills, and extracurricular activities they need to reassess once they transfer to a 4-year institution.
At Pathway2Career Consulting, we acknowledge that college students need personalized guidance and a strategic plan for transferring. Our goal is to help you be successful right from the start to the end of your transfer process. The transfer process requires a lot of focus and effort on behalf of the student. Therefore, it is crucial to work closely with our consultants to ensure that you meet with the correct departments, submit the proper documents on time, and have a clear plan for a seamless transition.
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Educational Consultant

How Has COVID Affected The Application & College Transfer Process

How Has COVID Affected The Application & College Transfer Process

Who thought the COVID-19 pandemic would have a significant impact on the college admissions process? Changes are still happening to admissions procedures as the rest of the world is trying to figure out solutions for managing COVID-19.
COVID-19 has impacted the college application process in numerous ways. Many higher education institutions have had to learn to adapt and evolve with the pandemic. This forced colleges and universities to re-access their admissions standards and requirements for the 2021-2022 applications. For instance, California’s public 4-year universities and several Private institutions decided to go “test-blind” by removing the SAT/ACT standardized test scores. Since college students are no longer required to submit test scores, many 4-year institutions have experienced an increase in applications during the 2020-2021 academic year.

Pass/Fail Grades

One of the issues community college students face is whether their pass/fail grades from the 2020-2021 academic year will transfer. This leaves many higher education institutions with some leeway to accept pass/fail grades only for the spring 2020 semester. As colleges and universities continue to adapt to the pandemic, some 4-year institutions have been unclear about pass/fail grades acceptance for the fall 2020 semester. Grading criteria are evolving with the pandemic’s impact, and the pass/fail option seems to place a great deal of pressure on community college transfer students.

Gap Year & Deferment

The economic downturn has hindered graduates and current students’ ability to find employment to pay for classes or even pay off student loans. College students have had to consider different factors when deciding to take a gap year or defer their enrollment. A valid issue that students have brought up is the difficulty of self-isolating oneself in their home to take online classes and study. While the “traditional” gap year is unavailable due to the pandemic, many students have learned to explore new virtual opportunities. Students can also explore new projects such as developing an app, creating a new product, finding study solutions and learning a new language. By deferring their enrollment, some students may be able to improve their knowledge and acquire extracurricular activities that they otherwise would not have if they had not taken a gap year.
Hopefully, the pandemic will encourage many colleges and universities to make great strides in creating a fair and inclusive college admissions process. Institutional stakeholders need to collaborate with different departments to fuse physical and virtual learning to enhance students’ experiences. Postsecondary institutions should understand that students who are taking a gap year or deferring their enrollment believe that their degree will not be in demand by future employers. With these struggles in mind, higher education institutions should focus on creating an admissions process that respects the boundaries set forth by the pandemic.